Patient Education

Yakety Yak Speech-Language Pathologists, Inc. would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Speech Disorders

Speech disorders can affect children from an early age, or they may develop later in life following trauma or injury. Most speech disorders are defined as the difficulty or inability to form speech sounds for communicating. Some speech disorders are just part of slower development in children and may go away on their own as the child gets older. Other children with speech problems or disorders that do not improve, may need speech therapy.

Regardless of when they occur, speech disorders can impact an individual's quality of life, causing difficulties at work, school, and many other social environments. Most speech disorders can be treated through speech therapy sessions with a licensed speech therapist. Very few speech disorders require surgical treatment. ...


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Newborn Hearing Screening

Newborn hearing screening is a noninvasive method used to detect hearing loss in newborns. Since 3 out of every 1000 newborns are born with permanent hearing loss, many of them with no known risk factors for the condition, newborn hearing screening is essential. Once limited to infants considered to be at high risk for hearing loss, such as premature infants, newborn hearing screening is now, although not mandated in every state, nearly universally performed. ...


Read More...

Swallowing Therapy

Patients that suffer from dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing may benefit from a form of treatment called swallowing therapy. Working with a speech pathologist, the patient will learn special exercises to improve the functioning of muscles associated with swallowing. Depending on the individual patient, swallowing therapy may also include a change in diet. ...


Read More...

Selective Mutism

Selective mutism is a psychological disorder in which a child who has already developed language skills stops speaking in particular circumstances. Most frequently the mutism occurs in children under the age of 5 in school or in another social environment and is considered to be an extreme form of social phobia. While it may seem to parents, peers or teachers that the child is simply refusing to speak, the child is actually unable to speak in the anxiety-producing situations. It is also possible that a child will experience selective mutism in the presence of a particular person rather than in a social situation. A specific trauma may precipitate a period of selective mutism. ...


Read More...

Pervasive Development Disorder

Pervasive development disorder, also known as PDD or autism spectrum disorder, refers to a group of conditions that affect a person's ability to effectively communicate and interact with others. PPD usually appears before the age of 3. While the specific cause of PDD is unknown, it is believed to be the result of neurological abnormalities and there may be a genetic component to its development. There are several different disorders classified as PDD, each with its own set of indicators, including: autism, Asperger's syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and Rett's syndrome. ...


Read More...

Stuttering

Stuttering, or stammering, is a complex, multidimensional speech disorder that affects nearly four million people in the United States. Stuttering occurs most commonly in children, between the ages of 2 and 6, as their language skills begin to develop. Approximately five percent of all children will stutter at some point in their lives. Stuttering affects three times as many boys as girls and they are more likely to continue to stutter as they age. Over the course of time, 70 to 80 percent of children who stutter will outgrow stuttering. Less than one percent of adults in the United States stutter. ...


Read More...

ADHD in Children

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD, is a chronic condition that affects children, with symptoms often continuing into adulthood. Common symptoms of ADHD include inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. ADHD affects the behavior of children both at home and in school. According to the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately eleven percent of children in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Boys are more commonly diagnosed with this condition than girls. Children with ADHD often struggle in school, have poor self-esteem and may be at an increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse as they get older. With treatment, however, most people with ADHD can lead successful and productive lives. ...


Read More...

Frenectomy

A frenectomy is a simple surgical procedure that is often used to treat an exceptionally short or tight frenulum. The frenulum, also known as the frenum, is the band of tissue that connects the tongue to the floor of the mouth. In some cases a short frenulum may cause a gap between the two front bottom teeth. This condition can restrict movement of the tongue and can affect a patient's ability to eat and speak with ease, causing a common condition informally known as being "tongue-tied". ...


Read More...

Frenuloplasty

Some children are born with an inherited birth defect in which the lingual frenulum, the tissue that connects the tongue to the bottom of the mouth, is abnormally short, which can restrict movement of the tongue. This condition is commonly referred to as "tongue-tied". While this condition does not always cause symptoms, some children may experience difficulty nursing, eating, speech problems or social obstacles because of their condition. ...


Read More...


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Speech Disorders

  1. Speech disorders can affect children from an early age, or they may develop later in life following trauma or injury. Most speech disorders are defined as the difficulty or inability to form speech sounds for communicating. Some speech disorders are just part of slower development in children and may go away on their own as the child gets older. Other children with speech problems or disorders that do not improve, may need speech therapy.

Regardless of when they occur, speech disorders can impact an individual's quality of life, causing difficulties at work, school, and many other social environments. Most speech disorders can be treated through speech therapy sessions with a licensed speech therapist. Very few speech disorders require surgical treatment. ...


Read More...

Newborn Hearing Screening

Newborn hearing screening is a noninvasive method used to detect hearing loss in newborns. Since 3 out of every 1000 newborns are born with permanent hearing loss, many of them with no known risk factors for the condition, newborn hearing screening is essential. Once limited to infants considered to be at high risk for hearing loss, such as premature infants, newborn hearing screening is now, although not mandated in every state, nearly universally performed. ...


Read More...

Swallowing Therapy

Patients that suffer from dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing may benefit from a form of treatment called swallowing therapy. Working with a speech pathologist, the patient will learn special exercises to improve the functioning of muscles associated with swallowing. Depending on the individual patient, swallowing therapy may also include a change in diet. ...


Read More...

Selective Mutism

Selective mutism is a psychological disorder in which a child who has already developed language skills stops speaking in particular circumstances. Most frequently the mutism occurs in children under the age of 5 in school or in another social environment and is considered to be an extreme form of social phobia. While it may seem to parents, peers or teachers that the child is simply refusing to speak, the child is actually unable to speak in the anxiety-producing situations. It is also possible that a child will experience selective mutism in the presence of a particular person rather than in a social situation. A specific trauma may precipitate a period of selective mutism. ...


Read More...

Pervasive Development Disorder

Pervasive development disorder, also known as PDD or autism spectrum disorder, refers to a group of conditions that affect a person's ability to effectively communicate and interact with others. PPD usually appears before the age of 3. While the specific cause of PDD is unknown, it is believed to be the result of neurological abnormalities and there may be a genetic component to its development. There are several different disorders classified as PDD, each with its own set of indicators, including: autism, Asperger's syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and Rett's syndrome. ...


Read More...

Stuttering

Stuttering, or stammering, is a complex, multidimensional speech disorder that affects nearly four million people in the United States. Stuttering occurs most commonly in children, between the ages of 2 and 6, as their language skills begin to develop. Approximately five percent of all children will stutter at some point in their lives. Stuttering affects three times as many boys as girls and they are more likely to continue to stutter as they age. Over the course of time, 70 to 80 percent of children who stutter will outgrow stuttering. Less than one percent of adults in the United States stutter. ...


Read More...

ADHD in Children

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD, is a chronic condition that affects children, with symptoms often continuing into adulthood. Common symptoms of ADHD include inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. ADHD affects the behavior of children both at home and in school. According to the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately eleven percent of children in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Boys are more commonly diagnosed with this condition than girls. Children with ADHD often struggle in school, have poor self-esteem and may be at an increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse as they get older. With treatment, however, most people with ADHD can lead successful and productive lives. ...


Read More...

Frenectomy

A frenectomy is a simple surgical procedure that is often used to treat an exceptionally short or tight frenulum. The frenulum, also known as the frenum, is the band of tissue that connects the tongue to the floor of the mouth. In some cases a short frenulum may cause a gap between the two front bottom teeth. This condition can restrict movement of the tongue and can affect a patient's ability to eat and speak with ease, causing a common condition informally known as being "tongue-tied". ...


Read More...

Frenuloplasty

Some children are born with an inherited birth defect in which the lingual frenulum, the tissue that connects the tongue to the bottom of the mouth, is abnormally short, which can restrict movement of the tongue. This condition is commonly referred to as "tongue-tied". While this condition does not always cause symptoms, some children may experience difficulty nursing, eating, speech problems or social obstacles because of their condition. ...


Read More...